Supporting Olivia Blake

At the moment, the Youth Representative for the National Executive Committee of the Labour Party is being contested by two individuals, Bex Bailey and Olivia Blake. Both of them are leading great campaigns, and both of them have shown so much passion that I believe that both would make excellent Youth Representatives for the NEC. However, I wish to use this opportunity to write down some thoughts regarding the campaign, and specifically cite why I will be supporting Olivia Blake for NEC Youth Rep.

The National Executive Committee, or NEC, is the governing body of the Labour Party, which oversees the overall direction of the party and the policy-making process. The NEC is made up of a range of opinion formers within the party, which includes affiliate organisations, trade unions, MPs, MEPs, the Leader and Deputy Leader of the Party, and so on. Crucially, one position on the Committee is reserved for someone to represent all young members, which is one of the most important ways for younger members to be represented by the Labour Party at the national level. Moreover, the Youth Rep will also sit on the national committee of Young Labour, which is the governing body for the subsidiary of the Labour Party. In many ways, this is an important election, but particularly because 2013-2014 will be crucial in setting the foundations for the general election campaign that Labour faces in 2015.

Unfortunately, Young Labour has become laborious and elitist through a combination of complex governing rules and regulations in addition to limited institutional flexibility. One of the most important and pressing issues is that almost all elections are conducted through delegate systems, which means that only delegates get to vote for certain positions, including the NEC Youth Rep. This is hugely frustrating given that regional representatives are elected directly through one member one vote (OMOV). It kind of suggests that direct elections are not only possible in theory, but feasible in practice. An associated problem for the organisations is that communication in general is kept to the barest minimum – if existent at all. For example, information regarding how to submit motions, the locations of previous conferences, and the information for how to become a delegate was kept unclear, which meant that some Labour Clubs found it difficult to organise meetings in time to form proposals, pass motions and elect delegates.

These issues also faces Labour Students, and so both organisations urgently need to deal with them. Otherwise, they could damage the claim that YL and LS are democratically-run organisations. What we need at this time, especially for Young Labour, is a candidate that will open up the processes of decision-making to all members under 27s, which will ensure that the NEC is properly represented. It means that there should be a renewed emphasis on transparency and democracy. One of the ways to do this is to break the elitism that seems to have grappled Young Labour at the moment. This will ensure not only that the organisation is run more democratically, but also ensure a greater diversity of opinion will be heard, fostering further inclusiveness of Young Labour. This, in turn, will feed back into the NEC.

I believe that Olivia Blake is the strongest candidate for this change to happen. Olivia is unconventional in that she is not based in London and did not study the usual ‘Politics, Philosophy and Economics’ at University. Olivia goes to the University of Sheffield and she is studying towards a PhD in Medical Biology. This alone makes her a candidate that will offer a fresh perspective on policy-making, something that has been marginalised to an extent. However, it is not only her background that is impressive, but her entire manifesto. It is detailed beyond reproach, and many of the policies that she cites are ones with which I can identify. These are less about where we stand on the left-right spectrum, which is where we potentially differ. However, we are united in our insurmountable appetite for reform of the structures that govern Young Labour (and, by extension, Labour Students). Some of her excellent policies include:

  • Guaranteed reports to members to ensure that communication and transparency is upheld. This is such a simple, useful policy that I cannot believe it has not been implemented before. I can’t remember when I last heard anything – if ever – from the current national committee, or the NEC Youth Rep for that matter.
  • Feedback sessions in every region of the country to ensure that all young members feel represented. This is another great policy because it will challenge the idea that YL is just based in and around London. It is true that regional Young Labour organisations do exist, but communication between them and the national organisation is not particularly strong or co-ordinated, at least not from where I’m standing.
  • Reform of youth elections to ensure that, in future, all young members get a direct vote in who represents them at the NEC and YL level. This is the bedrock that should sit at the apex of Young Labour. How is it that, in the twenty-first century, we are still electing positions using a nineteenth century system for a political party that is supposedly all about democracy?

These are just three policies that I’ve cited. Her full manifesto is available here. There are so many other things that Olivia wants to achieve that make her a good candidate for reform – including a women’s network, regional liberation groups, more communication online, opening up Young Labour events, and so on and so forth. I’m very proud to be a supporter of Olivia.

Olivia has been a campaigner for Labour for absolute ages, and tirelessly fought the corner for women’s rights, social justice and equality for as long as I can remember. Without doubt, Olivia has been inspirational in many ways. She was the person that gave me the courage to go door-knocking for the first time for the #labourdoorstep and encouraged me, advised me and helped me a great deal since I’ve met her in 2008. Her passion could never be doubted, for Labour in particular, and life in general.

I proudly support Olivia Blake for NEC Youth Rep.

mg

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